Dilution and the Demented

Demoncraps have adopted a new tactic: Dilution. Put simply, they’re using information overload to blind you to reality.

To show you how this works, Sivanathan describes two different students: Tim and Tom. Tim studies 31 hours a week outside class. Tom also studies 31 hours a week outside class. He has a brother and two sisters, he visits his grandparents, he once went on a blind date, and he plays pool every two months.

In an experiment, says Sivanathan, most of the participants said that Tim had a significantly higher GPA than Tom — even though the two put in the exact same amount of time studying. Why? All of the non-diagnostic information (the extraneous detail about his personal life) given about Tom diluted the diagnostic information (how many hours he studies) presented.
“The most robust psychological explanation for this is averaging,” says Sivanathan. Rather than adding up pieces of information and assigning them different values, most of us appear to average them in their minds. He adds, “So when you introduce irrelevant or even weak arguments, those weak arguments reduce the weight of your overall argument.”

Savanthan, N. (2020). How to make your arguments stronger (Hint: Longer is not the answer). TED Ideas. Pocket. Retrieved from: https://getpocket.com/explore/item/how-to-make-your-arguments-stronger-hint-longer-is-not-the-answer

“To show you how this works, Sivanathan describes two different students: Tim and Tom. Tim studies 31 hours a week outside class. Tom also studies 31 hours a week outside class. He has a brother and two sisters, he visits his grandparents, he once went on a blind date, and he plays pool every two months.

“In an experiment, says Sivanathan, most of the participants said that Tim had a significantly higher GPA than Tom — even though the two put in the exact same amount of time studying. Why? All of the non-diagnostic information (the extraneous detail about his personal life) given about Tom diluted the diagnostic information (how many hours he studies) presented.

“The most robust psychological explanation for this is averaging,” says Sivanathan. Rather than adding up pieces of information and assigning them different values, most of us appear to average them in their minds. He adds, “So when you introduce irrelevant or even weak arguments, those weak arguments reduce the weight of your overall argument.”

Now, I said, “Demoncraps,” but in reality, extremists on all sides of the political ball of truth are doing this, both through a plethora of information as well as through volumes of disinformation. As Megyn Kelly recently noted, “It’s to the point where I can’t tell what’s what.” Indeed, unless you’re a specialist in a particularly field, you’re not going to know heads from tails with respect to what’s real and what’s hogwash.

Yet the extremists, whether they be liberals, anti-maskers, racists, anti-vaxxers, socialists, BLM, communists, neo-Nazis, or any other flavor of the ridiculous, pick up on these snippets of ideology and blast it out there as if it were gospel. They do so, however, without first taking it to task, conducting PROPER research to determine it’s validity.

Improper research: I Googled the government’s destruction of the World Trade Center and found a thousand websites saying the same thing, so it MUST be true!

WRONG.

Proper research: I learned enough about fires to know that building fires can easily reach 800 deg F as well as enough about metallurgy to know that the strength of steel falls to half its rated strength at 800 deg F. Given the girders that were severed by the impact as well as the weakening of the others, it was inevitable they would buckle, creating near-simultaneous buckling like standing on a cola can and tapping it, with the vertical collapse of the entire structure.
CORRECT.

Same thing goes for masks:

Improper research: I Googled it, discovered that using a mask to stop the virus is like using a chain link fence to stop a mosquito; the legal disclaimers on all masks state they won’t stop coronavirus; I’m a nurse; I’m a doctor; “everyone” says they don’t work so they don’t work; common sense; if you can smell a fart through denim; diarrhea and denim; like trying to filter amoeba through a garden hose; if you can see through it there’s no way it can stop a virus; the virus is too small…
WRONG.

Proper research: Although the virus is tiny (1.2E-7m), it’s always carried away from the body i.e. transmitted via drops of mucous which range in size from 2E-5m to 2E-3m, some 200 to 20,000 times larger than the virus itself. Furthermore, even a totally dried droplet contains enough protein compounds that it condenses to a nuclei of 1E-6m, ten times larger than the virus itself. Finally, masks at microscopic scales do not operate like macroscopic filters such as a gravel filter. Rather, most of their filtration are the result of van der Walls force as it relates to surface science and condensed matter physics. Thus, filtering even dried nuclei is more like trying to pass steel ball bearings through a bunch of high-intensity magnets than dropping them through a chain link fence.
CORRECT.

Before you shove more false information out the door, find an expert – a REAL expert (not politicians like Fauci or political entities like the CDC or the WHO), and run it by them, first.

NO, being a doctor or a nurse does NOT make you an expert on the micro-particle physics of how masks work. It makes you a medical professional. Even medical professionals do NOT design masks. Aerospace and Materials Science Engineers design masks, usually with the help of additional scientists who specialize in physics at the microscopic level. Even so, it turns out cloth masks are well-suited for greatly slowing the spread of COVID-19, particularly when used by those who are infected but are of the 80% of infected people who never know they’re infected.