Court Rules People Have a “Fundamental Right” to Own Assault Weapons

OUTSTANDING!

From the article…

In a major victory for gun rights advocates, a federal appeals court on Thursday sided with a broad coalition of gun owners, businesses and organizations that challenged the constitutionality of a Maryland ban on assault weapons and other laws aimed at curbing gun violence. 

A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit said the state’s prohibition on what the court called “the vast majority of semi-automatic rifles commonly kept by several million American citizens” amounted to a violation of their rights under the Constitution.

Well, almost outstanding.  The judge seriously erred when he said, “In our view, Maryland law implicates the core protection of the Second Amendment — the right of law-abiding responsible citizens to use arms in defense of hearth and home.”  That’s not quite the “fundamental right” our Founding Fathers penned into the Constitution via our Second Amendment.

Chief Judge William Traxler erred when he limited the scope of understanding to “in defense of hearth and home.”  A “hearth” is the floor in front of a fireplace, where families of old would gather for dinner, usually cooked over that fireplace, and while away the evening hours basking in its warmth, discussing the day, and playing.

Our Second Amendment knows no such bounds, either on location or type and size of arms.

The Constitution states that all ratified amendments become a part of the Constitution.  Thus, the Constitution states “the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.”

This prohibition against the right of the people to keep and bear arms is absolute.  It’s application isn’t limited to a specific government entity.  It applies to everyone.  Furthermore, it’s scope isn’t limited, either.  For example, it’s not limited to “hearth and home,” but rather applies every where a free man may travel.

It’s not even limited to “firearms.”  Our Founding Fathers chose the term, “arms,” even though knew exceedingly well that the term “firearms” was a type of arms that used a rapidly-burning powder to discharge a projectile.  A sword is also a type of arms, as is a club, mace, hatchet, machete, and knife.  They are all “arms.”  Thus, any restriction — infringement — on their size, length, weight, caliber, action, mechanism, or capacity constitutes an infringement, and an un-Constitutional one, at that.

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